Marketing at the Speed of Life

Episode 3. I hope you enjoyed our previous two Cup of Jo video featuring Karla Congson and Steve Mast. Today, we’re speaking with the incredibly dynamic and wickedly smart Dalia Asterbadi, CEO, Founder and Chief Data Scientist of Verve.ai. A hybrid engineer and marketer, Dalia has been blazing trails in the computer science world since she was eight years old. Author of “Making It in High Heels” and “The 31 Immutable Plays of Prospecting“, Dalia is an expert in the world of machine learning and a key thinker in the exploding world of data.

Grab a coffee and take it all in.

 

[Michael Chase]
The world of marketing technology, or MarTech as we know it, has seen some incredibly massive disruptions. From your standpoint, what are some of the biggest disruptions you’ve seen out there today?

[Dalia Asterbadi]
Well, first of all I think in the last 15 years, since ClubRunner all the way down to realSociable , one thing I have seen is the rise of automation. The rise of counting things and now the big disruptions are those who are helping marketers become heroes. Real disrupters are helping take situation analysis, inject real value add customer-centric conversations and I think that the real disruptions are really acknowledging people, and saying, “Look we know you’ve got a lot functionality. Let’s take that one level up and see how we can introduce confidence to that functionality.”

[Michael Chase]
How do you see people dealing with the world of big data today?

[Dalia Asterbadi]
The reality of big data and dealing with it, is really understanding what you as an organization want to uncover. Whether they’re blind spots or key elements in your customer journey, that if you could individualize that or act on it, at scale, what that would do to unlock ROI and of course build competitive edge.

[Michael Chase]
That blurring world of sales and marketing, and where it’s going. What do you see the future of that, because I don’t know if people really understand it today.

[Dalia Asterbadi]
Today’s world it’s who’s here in marketing? If we understand that if we can lend a role in how we can capture, analyze, track, perform and engage at every stage, sales and marketing would be less about misalignment and more around opportunity and brand equity.

[Michael Chase]
What’s interesting is as robotics, machine learning, artificial intelligence start to enter our world, people start to get a little afraid of it and think Terminator. The Terminator world’s coming, and our world is going to end because the robots are going to take over. Are we taking that too far?

[Dalia Asterbadi]
This notion of computer generated data or intelligence has been part of the foundational elements of the first compiler. At the same token, it’s about improving process. This Skynet notion, it’s interesting, which is why I say when we talk about AI and the promise of augmented intelligence, and the future towards how we embrace technology in our communications practices, I would rather say this is a moment where we can apply situation analysis. Where we can be a triage with our technology, not a by-product or a victim of it. If you embrace that attitude, what you’re really essentially saying is I’m going to inject more confidence in the talent behind technology.

[Michael Chase]
How do we look at the world of content and good content through artificial intelligence?

[Dalia Asterbadi]
Google, like all of us in this space, are just trying to add new dimensions, so that we can optimize to the audience, or the reader, to the searcher because not everyone is treated equally, I think that this is what we’re seeing in general when it comes to customer centricity.

[Michael Chase]
That brings up an interesting world for retailers and brands. How do they go out there and embrace this new technology?

[Dalia Asterbadi]
I actually think this is one for the best opportunities for retailers and brands. One example I like to show is Starbucks. They, over and over, have one of the best applications, have one of the greatest loyalty. They have the most important competitive advantage, which is the front line. I’m certain they have a great team behind their information, their innovation, but we don’t hear of them spending hundreds of millions for dollars trying to look at data and history and proactively find moments. They’re out there embracing that. That front line advantage is the opportunity I see for all of us, where your can take that technology and start looking at methods of communication that go beyond parity.

[Michael Chase]
Just wrapping up today, what do you think the one thing brands can do to help them transform the way they engage with people?

[Dalia Asterbadi]
Sometimes our biggest mistake is we think our customers think about us as much as we think about them. If we can just change that, I think we could get into a really interesting time and the best one for that matter.

Now, tell us how we can help