Neuromarketing Your Brain on Advertising

Episode 7.  Today, we’re speaking with Elissa Moses, CEO of the Ipsos Centre of Excellence for Neuro and Behavioral Science Center of Excellence. In this video, discusses the science of neuromarketing and how the brain engages with physical and digital channels.

You can access the full playlist on Youtube. Be sure to subscribe to our Youtube channel to receive notifications when we publish new content.

Grab a coffee and take it all in.


[Michael Chase]
Tell us a little bit about why brands need to understand Neuro Marketing today.

[Elissa Moses]
We need to understand how the brain reacts to information and what that does to possibly influencing decision making, and influencing behavior. What we’ve learned through neuroscience is that the non-conscious is every bit as important as the conscious and, some will say, it is wildly more important. That’s because there are neuro networks in the brain that have to do with associations with brands. Which almost like a wave can kind of well up, without our even thinking about why we end up making a choice or taking a behavior. It’s because all of these different associations are calculating and giving us an answer, and that sometimes goes way beyond conscious thought.

[Michael Chase]
Your recent work with Canada Post and your study that you’ve just put out on neuro marketing; why is it so important?

[Elissa Moses]
It’s one of the most wonderful studies I’ve been involved with in my career, and one of the most wonderful studies I think that’s really out there with respect to advertising and understanding media effects. Incredibly pioneering to be able to understand how people engage with different kinds of channels. All the different digital channels, as well as direct mail. What the impact is for engaging people, motivating people, and then taking it a big leap forward. What happens when we combine the different effects of different media? Of digital and direct mail. And what happens when we even change the order? Is there a measurable effect? No one has ever done that before. It ultimately makes it much more exciting to do media planning, because you’re armed with some information about how to use each option to it’s best benefit for your brand.

[Michael Chase]
Let’s talk physical for a second. How do physical things like print effect our brains?

[Elissa Moses]
It effects our brains on a number of levels. One is the fact that when we’re reading print we can go at our own pace. That means that we really have the luxury of digesting, processing, thinking about building connections, making some preliminary decisions. Almost imagining what it might be like to use that product, to buy that product, to put that product into your life. It’s very, very powerful. The other piece of direct mail is that it’s tactile. The more that you can stimulate the senses the more you’re going to make a lasting impact on perception.

[Michael Chase]
I’ve heard you say this before; why is this the best time to be in marketing and advertising?

[Elissa Moses]
What we’re seeing is a huge closing of the gap of what we didn’t know and needed to know long ago. That has to do with being able to measure the emotional impact of advertising, the engagement of advertising. So that even though our conscious measures can sometimes fail us in terms of people saying how they feel about something, or if they remember something. The non-conscious tells us that there was arousal, that there was engagement, that there was excitement. Depending on the kind of measure you use, life facial coding, you can see that there was happiness, or there was confusion. Now we have a science behind advertising that meshes and converges with the art of it and just us so much more effective. It’s magical.

[Michael Chase]
Tell me one thing brands can do today to transform the way they engage with people.

[Elissa Moses]
This may surprise you because it goes back to things we’ve known a long time ago. Which is that you need to be very simple in your message, and very specific. Having worked for years on strategies that are sometimes beautiful and elaborate, then I see the creative that’s associated with it and the key message isn’t there, and people wonder why isn’t is communicating what it’s supposed to communicate? We really need to think more about how people process information, and understand that we need to actually use the words and phrases that we want to get across, and be very specific. Then we want to repeat those and connect the dots for people coming from a lot of different media and sources so that it really gels in peoples mind. Quite honestly, if you want to know who’s best at this, a lot of the politicians. I won’t name names, but some of the politicians are very, very good at saying candidate A, attribute A. It may be not true at all but they’ve created that neuro network, that association. That’s what brands should do in a positive way.

Now, tell us how we can help